FAVORITE NON-FICTION BOOKS

My reading of non-fiction books has plummeted the last 2 years. Today, I tend to only read articles. Nevertheless, I think the listed titles will continue to have an appeal in the foreseeable future. This list excludes philosophy books, as those will get a favorite list of its own. 

Books are listed by publication year, youngest first. Click on the covers to go to the Goodreads page for the books.

MORAL TRIBES – EMOTION, REASON AND THE GAP BETWEEN US AND THEM – Joshua Greene (2013)

This is the best book about ethics and human behavior I’ve ever read. It combines insights from biology and philosophy in a great way. It’s up to date, written in a lucid, crisp prose, and generally even fun. You don’t have to have scientific or philosophical background to understand it, Greene has written a self-contained book, but it is nonetheless important and might even be revelatory for people who do have a large knowledge of both fields. Maybe the most important book on this list, as it also offers solid advice for shaping politics.

 

POWER SYSTEMS: CONVERSATIONS ON GLOBAL DEMOCRATIC UPRISINGS AND THE NEW CHALLENGES TO U.S. EMPIRE – Noam Chomsky (2012)

Interviews David Barsamian had with Chomsky between 2010-2012. Fairly recent, with a broad scope. The focus in this collection is on American imperialism/capitalism and the failing of democracy. As Chomsky is an icon of progressive thought, this short book (under 200 pages) should be an obligatory read for anyone interested in contemporary politics, economy and world affairs. The interview form makes it not as dense and difficult as some of Chomsky’s other publications, but it is still chockfull of convincing arguments & facts. Especially Kim Stanley Robinson fans should take note.

 

THE FLEXIBLE PHENOTYPE – A BODY-CENTRED INTEGRATION OF ECOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, AND BEHAVIOUR  –  Theunis Piersma & Jan A. Van Gils (2011)

This is the best hard science book I’ve read in the last decade. It’s self-contained, and not that difficult for a non-specialist. The main focus is on the flexibility of the phenotype, as the title suggests. Eye-opening stuff.

I couldn’t do a better job than the blurb from Oxford University Press, even though it is a bit heavy-handed: “The Flexible Phenotype attempts a true synthesis of physiology, behavior, and ecology by developing an empirical argument that describes the intimate connections between phenotypes and their environments. It portrays an ecological angle to the rapidly growing extended synthesis in evolutionary biology that incorporates developmental processes, self-organization, and the multiple dimensions of inheritance. The book starts with a synthesis of the principles guiding current research in ecophysiology, functional morphology, and behavioral ecology. Each aspect is illustrated with the detailed results of empirical work on as wide a range of organisms as possible. The integrated story of the flexible phenotype is woven throughout the book on the basis of the authors’ long-term research on migrant shorebirds and their invertebrate prey.”

 

THE ATLAS OF THE REAL WORLD: MAPPING THE WAY WE LIVE – Danny Dorling, Mark Newman & Anna Barford (2008)

In this book “sophisticated software combined with comprehensive analysis of every aspect of life represents the world as it really is. Digitally modified maps depict the areas and countries of the world not by their physical size but by their demographic importance on a vast range of topics.” It has 366 maps, with topics as different as fuel use, alcohol consumption, population & malaria.

There’s an excellent free website with the source material. The site even has 696 maps, and has more up-to-date data, so you don’t really need to buy the book at all… http://www.worldmapper.org/

 

PRIMATES AND PHILOSOPHERS: HOW MORALITY EVOLVED – Frans de Waal (2006)

THE APE AND THE SUSHI MASTER: CULTURAL REFLECTIONS OF A PRIMATOLOGIST – Frans de Waal (2001)

When one of Kim Stanley Robinson’s characters in Green Earth talks about humans being from the savanna, that sounds familiar because of I’ve read quite a lot of Frans De Waal, probably the most prominent primatologist alive. His Chimpanzee Politics (1982) was revolutionary for the field. To me, the biological outlook proved to be a revelation and still is something that’s liberating when talking about ethics, behavior and society. At the same time he proves time and time again that the gap between animals and humans isn’t nearly as wide as we tend to believe. De Waal’s prose is accessible, even witty at times.

A lot of De Waal’s work has some overlap, so I could have just as well listed Our Inner Ape: A Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are (2005). I haven’t read his more recent books The Age Of Empathy – Nature’s Lessons For A Kinder Society (2009) and Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? (2016), but I’m sure they’ll be good entry points too.

 

THE FABRIC OF THE COSMOS: SPACE, TIME AND THE TEXTURE OF REALITY – Brian Greene (2003)

The best and most complete book I’ve read on time, space, quantum physics, Einstein, superstrings, black holes, subatomics, the Higgs boson, the big bang, &cetera. You don’t need previous knowledge to read this book, but it isn’t an easy read. There’s not a lot of math or formulas, but you do need your brain to handle all the dense information. Well written, smooth, with the occasional entertaining anecdote.

The basic question it tries to solve is why time has a direction, whereas there is nothing in physics which seems to dictate that. Using that angle, the entire history of the field passes through the book’s 500 plus pages.

 

THE PROPHET MUHAMMAD: A BIOGRAPHY  – Barnaby Rogerson  (2003)

Let me just quote Jason Webster in The Guardian: “Scholarly works on Muhammad have tended to bog themselves down in arguments over sources, or new theories cunningly devised to undermine their rivals in the field. While obviously knowing his subject inside out, Rogerson has cleverly avoided this trap, concentrating instead on the tale itself, freeing up the flow of knowledge blocked by the academic approach. Some will scoff, others will simply ignore it, but the book is designed for the general audience, not for university dons. If, as the medieval Arab philosopher Al-Ghazali suggested, people oppose things because they are ignorant of them, then this is an important book, and couldn’t have come at a more opportune time.”

 

BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND HUMAN NATURE  – Timothy Goldsmith & William Zimmerman (2001)

The titles says it all, but the stress is definitely on the first word. Certain parts are quite technical and heavy on chemistry, but you can’t beat this if you want the basics of life explained thoroughly. It has a lot of illustrations and a broad reach, from molecular biology to nervous systems to human culture.

It’s a modular book, so if you’re not interested in a certain (sub)section, you can just skip it.

 

DEMONIC MALES – APES AND THE ORIGINS OF HUMAN VIOLENCE – Richard Wrangham & Dale Peterson (1996)

Fantastic book. Its basic question is why humans use violence against each other, and are pretty unique in the animal kingdom in doing so. Its approach is quite broad, and after a few chapters it starts comparing us to the other three great apes. The answer is a surprising combination of biology and geography that influences society and behavior.

Both eye-opening and entertaining!

 

FORCES IN MOTION: THE MUSIC AND THOUGHTS OF ANTHONY BRAXTON – Graham Lock (1989)

Revelatory book on American composer, multi-instrumentalist, saxophone virtuoso and musical theorist Anthony Braxton. Braxton is a seminal figure in the world of jazz and contemporary music, and was the very first to release a solo saxophone album in 1969 – fully improvised nonetheless. Graham Lock recounts his travels with Braxton’s classic quartet in Britain in 1985. The book also features interviews with Braxton and the band. Insightful and at times funny & heartfelt, it is a must read for any Braxton fan, and will surprise any other serious lover of the avant-garde. Forces In Motion offers a way into the often murky and dense thoughts of one of the great musical innovators of the 20th century.

 

– DUTCH ONLY –

ALS GOD SPREEKT  – Geert Lernout (2005)

Een boek over het ontstaan van de grote monotheistische godsdiensten, dat focust op het ontstaan en de geschiedenis van De Bijbel, de Koran en het Boek van Mormon.

Erg interessant en heel breed van opzet, met heel veel randinformatie uit de algemene (cultuur)geschiedenis.

 

EEN BEKNOPTE GESCHIEDENIS VAN HET BOEK – Geert Lernout (2004)

De titel zegt het al. Opnieuw heel erg breed van opzet, waardoor je niet alleen een goed zicht krijgt op de geschiedenis van het boek, maar op grote delen van de menselijke ontwikkeling: het begint bij de ontwikkeling van het schrift, en focust op de laatste 5 eeuwen. Erg, erg vlot geschreven.

 

Heel wat van de boeken uit de lijst in het Engels zijn ook in het Nederlands vertaald, met name die van Frans de Waal, Brian Greene, Barnaby Rogerson en Richard Wrangham & Dale Peterson.

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8 responses to “FAVORITE NON-FICTION BOOKS

  1. I have not read any of these – MAYBE I will do better with your philosophy list

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m salivating at the mention of all of these titles, even the Dutch ones which your descriptions hint are worth considering (if only there were translations).

    I’ve spent the last few years catching up on fiction I’ve neglected but you remind me that the narratives of non-fictions are just as exciting and engaging, if not more so.

    Trained as a classical musician I remain tongue-tied when it comes to the language of jazz — though I’m not averse to listening to a wide range I do however find free-form as perplexing as aleatoric music. Or maybe the mysteries of quantum physics …

    Liked by 1 person

    • Braxton is not really jazz anymore, he started out in that field, and still records albums with standards at times, but his main occupation is a kind of post-Cageian composition, in which chance and freedom have their part. His work is highly diverse, too rich to describe in a few lines. There’s solo improv albums, jazz quartets, music written for 4 orchestras playing simultaneously, avant-garde operas, graphic scores, music for bagpipes and ipods, etc., etc. He’s a virtuoso, and so are all the people he plays with.

      It’s not really entry level I guess :). Coming from more hard genres like metal and rock, I got hooked by John Zorn & Masada, ended up appreciating the classics like John Coltrane & Miles David, and ended up expanding my tastes via Braxton and European Free Improvisation – and a healthy of classical music – to what I listen to now a lot: things like the Wandelweiser collective. See this interesting article for more on that: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/09/05/silence-overtakes-sound-for-the-wandelweiser-collective

      Like

  3. bitchybookreviews

    Wow my TBR list just grew! Moral Tribes sounds fascinating

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Heb je Darwin’s Hofvijver van Tijs Goldschmidt wel eens gelezen? Vond het zelf wel een mooie mix van evolutietheorie en cultuurverschillen zonder dat het echt heel erg technisch wordt.

    Liked by 1 person

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